Home / Mammals / Memeliler / Gerbillus dasyurus / Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner's Gerbil, Rough-tailed Dipodil / Wagner'in Gerbili, Kabakuyruklu Dipodil)
4/4

Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner's Gerbil, Rough-tailed Dipodil / Wagner'in Gerbili, Kabakuyruklu Dipodil)

slideshow metadata Share on Facebook Share on Facebook
Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner's Gerbil, Rough-tailed Dipodil / Wagner'in Gerbili, Kabakuyruklu Dipodil)


Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner's Gerbil, Rough-tailed Dipodil / Wagner'in Gerbili, Kabakuyruklu Dipodil) from KİLİS - 24.04.2007.

Wagner’s gerbil is a medium-sized (Head-body length: 7 - 11 cm; Tail Lenght: 8.4-14.5 cm; Weight: 27 g) and slender rodent with a silky coat. The hair on the upperparts of Wagner’s gerbil is sandy-brown in colour and grey at the base, and the underside is white. The tail is covered in short, coarse hairs, apart from the tip which possesses a tuft of finer hair (It is not obvious in my shot, probably it was damaged with a potential pradator attack). Two subspecies are recognised: Gerbillus dasyurus dasyurus and Gerbillus dasyurus leosollicitus. G. d. leosollicitus is typically the darker of the two subspecies, although the colour of the fur varies in accordance to its precise habitat, providing optimum camouflage. Male Wagner’s gerbils are generally larger and heavier than females. It is widespread in the Middle East. Its range includes Turkey, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, the Arabian Peninsula, and the eastern deserts of Egypt. Inhabits a diverse range of habitats including mountainous areas (up to 2,000 metres), rocky hills, semi-desert and desert.

Wagner’s gerbil is a nocturnal, burrowing rodent, with a varied diet that includes insects, seeds, succulent plants and herbs. Unlike other gerbil species, it also has an astonishing preference for snails, and snail shells often litter the surrounds of the burrow. Has a fascinating way of communicating with other members of the same species, making sounds by kicking the ground with its hind feet. The breeding season typically falls between January and September, but can extend to November. Approximately three litters, of between three and nine young, are produced each year , born after a gestation period of 18 to 26 days. Born blind, naked and with closed ears, young Wagner’s gerbils only begin to grow hair at six days old and open their eyes and ears at around 16 days. Weaning takes place at 32 days after birth and pups become independent from their mothers when they are around five weeks old. Both sexes have a lifespan of up to two and a half years.

References: 1. Göçmen, B. (Unpub. results). The results of herpetological trips. 2. ARKive. 3. Shenbrot, I.G., Krasnov, R.B. and Khoklova, S.I. (1997). Biology of Wagner’s gerbil Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner, 1842) (Rodentia: Gerbillidae) in the Negev Highlands, Israel. Mammalia, 61(4): 467-486. 4. Çolak, E., Sozen, M., Yigit, N. and Özkurt, S. (1999). Observations on the Reproductive Biology of Gerbillus dasyurus (Wagner, 1842) (Mammalia: Rodentia) in Turkey.Turkish Journal of Zoology, 23: 243-246. 5. Harrison, D.L. (1956). Gerbils from Iraq, with description of a new gerbil. Journal of Mammalogy, 37(3): 417-422.

Author Bayram GÖÇMEN
Created on Tuesday 24 April 2007
Posted on Monday 07 February 2011
Tags Kilis, TURKEY / TÜRKİYE
Albums
Visits 9790